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How much concentrated dish washing liquid do I need to use?

 by Julie Finch-Scally

It has been at least six months since I started using the new super concentrated dish washing liquid.  The product works well and smells great, but I can never judge the amount I need to squeeze into the sink.  I get either too many bubbles, which takes for ever to dissolve down the plug hole; or I get too little product and it won't do the job.

The other problem that is driving me to distraction is the nozzle constantly gets clogged.  After experimenting with several ways of removing the coagulated liquid, such as scraping out the mess with a spike or cloth, I finally found it easier to take off the lid and put it into the water while washing up.  When I had finished doing the dishes the hole in the nozzle was clear and I could replace the top onto the bottle.  Only problem is after a few more uses the nozzle is choked again.

Last week I thought I'd be smart.  I reasoned, if I diluted the liquid it wouldn't be so thick, then I would be able to judge how much product I would need and it wouldn't clog the nozzle.  Wrong.  Not a good idea.  If you have been thinking of trying this, don't bother.  It didn't help.

I had half a bottle of the concentrated solution left so I filled the bottle with water and shook it gently to dissolve the water in the washing up liquid.  Because the nozzle hole is so wide I now slightly tip the bottle and a stream of fluid empties into the water which gives me, yes, you've guessed it, too many bubbles. 

I know is says on  the bottle "Use half as much", but I would like to know how.  When it was thick I could never judge the amount of liquid needed, now it is thin I still can't judge the amount, I just get what pours out through the hole.

I am frustrated and looking for the answer.  How do I work out how much concentrated dish washing liquid I should pour in the sink to clean the varying number of dishes I need to wash after each meal?  Also, how do I stop the nozzle getting clogged?  If anyone out there knows the answer to these questions I would be very happy to find out.

 

 

Are you or someone you know thinking of selling their property?

 

Julie Finch-Scally

The Guru of Cleaning®

can show you how

 

In Ebook format the two books

 

‘Preparing your Apartment for Sale

and

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Disinfectant in Cleansers

by Julie Finch-Scally

There has been promotion recently for cleansers and liquid soap containing disinfectant. The adverts are aimed at Mums to help keep their children safe from all diseases.

I can understand Mums looking at this advertising and thinking the product must be good; we all want to keep our children safe. But do these products come with a guarantee that this will be the case? I don’t believe so.

Every child should be taught to wash their hands after using the bathroom and prior to eating, and then it wouldn’t be necessary for children to be constantly subjected to disinfectant.

Disinfectant kills germs. That is why they’re used in hospitals where there is more infection. But in a home, providing there is a regular regime of keeping the house clean; it is very unlikely a child will catch some devastating disease. Children who do pick up dangerous viruses have come in contact with a carrier outside their home. If a child’s hands were cleaned when they left the playground or after playing with other children, there would be less chance of contagion.

From the time they are born children put things in their mouth. Children have been known to eat dirt and never have bad reactions to the experience. Actually a doctor will tell you, children playing in dirt and mixing with other children helps them build up immunity to germs and diseases. Many doctors think it is good for children to get such diseases as measles and mumps when they are young, because to get them when they are an adult is dangerous.

Constantly cleaning a house with disinfectant doesn’t remove germs that will kill you, it removes every bacteria, some of which can be helpful and increase your and your child’s immunity.

Since I started working in the cleaning industry I wash my hands a lot more. I make a point of coming home from every excursion; and that could include visiting a friend or doing the shopping; and going straight to the bathroom to thoroughly wash my hands. Not with disinfectant, but with soap and water. Any germs I have touched while outside are removed and my hands are clean.

If all of us washed our hands more often with soap and water we would have less concerns about coming down with a devastating disease. Let’s leave the disinfectant for the cuts and abrasions that need it.

 

 

Are you or someone you know thinking of selling their property?

 

Julie Finch-Scally

The Guru of Cleaning®

can show you how

 

In Ebook format the two books

 

‘Preparing your Apartment for Sale

and

‘Preparing your House for Sale

 

will take you from ‘decision’ to ‘moving’

 

find out how to purchase from

the ‘Cleaning Books’ section

 

 
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